Government of New Brunswick

Entrepreneurs from far and wide are recognized and respected as successful role models in communities across New Brunswick.

Opportunities New Brunswick is a complete resource for the New Brunswick start-up business.  On this site, the province’s economic development agency provides information about business costs and incentives, specialized services and success stories.

New Brunswick also offers Bizpal, an online, one-stop service for entrepreneurs that simplifies the process of finding information on business permits and licences from all levels of government – federal, provincial, and municipal.

Canada Business – New Brunswick is an innovative federal-provincial partnership designed to improve the start-up, survival and growth rates of small and medium sized enterprises in every part of New Brunswick through access to accurate, timely and relevant information and referrals.

The Small Business Investor Tax Credit program provides an important source of capital by increasing access to equity financing for New Brunswick small businesses, and encourages investment by NB residents in local small businesses.

 

Starting a business

Succeeding with your own business takes talent and persistence; following these steps will start you on the right path:

  • choose a business structure;
  • choose and register your business name;
  • learn about the permits and license you are going to need;
  • complete your business plan;
  • learn about being an employer in New Brunswick;
  • learn about recruiting employees;
  • choose a location for your business;
  • obtain business insurance;
  • learn about safety and security; and
  • market your business.

 

Three guides for immigrant entrepreneurs

 

Business support organizations

 

Taxes for businesses

When you own a business in New Brunswick, you will need to be aware of the business taxes for which you will be responsible:

  • income tax from self-employment;
  • tax on corporate income;
  • property taxes;
  • Thirteen per cent harmonized sales tax (HST), similar to the value-added tax (VAT) levied in other countries.

The Canada Revenue Agency is primarily responsible for collecting taxes based on income, profit and sales. Provinces and municipalities are primarily responsible for collecting property taxes. These taxes are based on the assessed value of real estate such as land and buildings.

 

Business owners typically must take into consideration:

Contacting a tax professional for more information, including how to take advantage of tax incentives and other tax relief.

Finding commercial real estate in New Brunswick through the Canadian Real Estate Association.

In New Brunswick, you have rights as an employee and as an employer to be treated fairly. Our Employment Standards Act offers minimum employment rules on such things as minimum wage, overtime pay, vacations with pay, and sick leave. You can find out more about fair and equitable workplace practice through our Employment Standards Branch. Find out about working safely and promoting workplace safety at WorkSafe NB.

For Labour and Training resources, refer to, Department of Post-Secondary Education, Training and Labour.  For information on bringing skilled workers to Canada, refer to Employment and Social Development Canada.

Some groups and government agencies provide financial resources to local businesses and start-ups: